New Hampshire made substantial changes to the way we calculate child support in the Granite State. Generally, the way child support is calculated is to take the person owing child support’s net income and then take a percentage of that net income as child support. Traditionally, this was 25% for one child, 33% for two children, and 40% for 3 or more. With the new changes, these figures can change fairly dramatically.

Here is the link to the new child support guidelines tables. As you can see, gone are the round numbers we used previously, and instead, we have more defined figures based on each parties’ income. The more you make, the less percentage is taken out of your income. The problem that was being generated was high-income wage earners were getting stuck with significant child support amounts. For instance, under the new rules, a wage earner making $14,000 or more will pay 19% for one child, 26% for two children, 31% for three children, and 33.5% for four or more children. For a person who makes approximately $5,300.00, the figures will be 23% for one child, 31.5% for two children, 38% for three children, and 40.5% for four or more children. This helps better calculate child support amounts that are more commensurate with the wages one earns.

The new guidelines also call for specific amounts for three children, and now have a four or more children option. Three children are generally much more common than once anticipated, so having a specific calculation for three children will help keep the child support figures more accurate and in line with what each wage-earner makes.

These child support calculation changes went into effect on July 1st, 2013 and are the law of New Hampshire. If you need assistance with any modification of child support, either based on the three year modification as a matter of right, or a substantial change in circumstances, contact the experienced family attorneys of arnell, Parnell, Michels & McKay.